• What is SPF

    What is SPF

    The product “RIGIFOAM Closed Cell Polyurethane Sprayfoam” which THERMAMASTA install,is a Closed-Cell, Rigid Polyurethane version of ‘SPF’, With superior Thermal Insulation performance, when compared to other ‘SPF’ formulations.

  • Building Professionals

    Building Professionals

    Closed-Cell SPF is especially suited to be applied externally, and due to its seamless nature, is unmatched for its ability to perform these duties. But even a roof insulated from underneath.

  • Building Managers and Owners

    Building Managers and Owners

    Closed-cell Spray Polyurethane Foam (SPF) systems deliver longer life expectancy and lower lifecycle costs over traditional systems, while affording superior protection to the building.

  • Before & After

    Before & After

    Photos of before & after the project started and finished.

Chicken Loft Insulation

What happens when a poultry house is not insulated? Probably most of us would assume higher energy costs. Obviously this is right, although this is not the only one correct answer. Not only does insulation affect heating costs, but also other issues like feeding costs, mortality losses, meat quality etc.
In this paper is focused on poultry farms, as poultries are one of the more sensible animals and the number of stables all over Europe is very high. But all mentioned points are also true for other kind of animals (e.g. pigs).

If you don’t want to waste money you will go for…

1

Poultry genetic breeding has improved a lot during the last decade and this is the main reason why thermal insulation in poultry houses is a very necessary condition due to the specific and narrow temperature range to which animals have to be breed. This range moves from 30ºC during the first week to 24 ºC the third week.

How does the right insulation help farmer with their daily work?

21).- Energy losses: Deep internal body temperature of chickens is over 41ºC. Birds generate heat when they eat. Fullyfeathered birds actually produce excess heat, which their body must shed, thereby warming their surrounding. For this reason supplemental heat is usually needed except in early brooding period. Heating costs represent 5% of the farmer’s costs in Spain (figure 2).

2).- Environmental quality and mortality losses: In summer, when it’s too hot, the temperature inside the building rise up very fast and birds may die because of choking. While in winter, in a poorly ventilated farm, trying to maintain the temperature in order to not loose too much energy, windows must be closed and therefore the humidity of the bed will increase and as a consequence a lot of ammonia will be given off. This causes many breathing problems and therefore the quality of the chicken meat will decrease.

3).- Food intake, production and yield: The challenge is keeping birds from over heating nor from getting too cold. When animals overheat, they stop eating and therefore production and yields decreases as they need more time to achieve the desired weight. When it’s too cold, birds try to maintain the corporal temperature by eating more feed although the conversion is worst. All in all birds are less efficient in feeding terms.

Just as an example, in a 30.000 chicken farm having a difference of 5ºC (15ºC or 20ºC), in 21 days chickens will have eaten 85gr more of food and still have a weight of 25gr less. This means a loos of 1706 € in three weeks (816€ for the extra feed and 890€ for the chicken’s kg lost) and 3.385 € per growing period. (Source: G. Santomá y M. Pontes, XX Curso FEDNA. 2004)

Insulate for cost savings (payback time of investment): A case of two typical industrialized Spanish poultry farms (one insulated and one not insulated) was studied in order to determine the differences of the annual costs and the investment payback. 3Both buildings had a surface of 1.800m² and a capacity of 30.000 chickens but they were build up with different solutions: one of them without any kind of insulation, made by bricks (R=0.16) and fiber cement (R= 0.02), and the other with PIR sandwich panels (R=1.42) or fiber cement plus PU spray (R=1.09) in the ceiling and PIR sandwich panels (R=1.78) or bricks plus PU spray in the wall surface (R=1.36). The average temperature of 5 different growing periods along the year from the Spanish where there is more density of poultry farms were used as external temperatures in order to make the calculations of the heating costs as real as possible. The different investment costs as well as the different operating costs (including all costs like heating, feed stock, animals, electricity, water, disinfection, collection and others) were used to calculate the accumulated savings along the years and it was evidenced that the investment payback was around 2.5 years in the case of new buildings and around 4 years in the case of retrofit.

Conclusion: All in all with the right insulation system, we could (i) reduce production costs around 10% due to energy costs, lower mortality and better feed intake, (ii) raise yield and quality around 14% partly because 6.4 growing periods per annum could be done instead of 5.5 and (iii) last but not least reduce CO2 emissions around 20%.

Just as an example, in a 30.000 chicken farm having a difference of 5ºC (15ºC or 20ºC), in 21 days chickens will have eaten 85gr more of food and still have a weight of 25gr less. This means a loos of 1706 € in three weeks (816€ for the extra feed and 890€ for the chicken’s kg lost) and 3.385 € per growing period. (Source: G. Santomá y M. Pontes, XX Curso FEDNA. 2004)